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2.2

Minor Versionm

by Madhushree HS

Introduction

Chemical explosions come in various forms. Here is one that is safe and can be done in your kitchen! Afterwards, we detect the gas formed using lime water.

Video Overview

    • Do not ingest any materials.

    • Handle paper cutter/scissors with care.

  1. Measure 5 cm from one end of a fat straw and make a mark. Cut the straw at the mark made. Pinch the straw at one end and tape it. Our measuring cup is now ready. The pinching is done to avoid the powder from sticking to the tape.
    • Measure 5 cm from one end of a fat straw and make a mark. Cut the straw at the mark made.

    • Pinch the straw at one end and tape it. Our measuring cup is now ready.

    • The pinching is done to avoid the powder from sticking to the tape.

    • The measuring cup made, can hold approximately 1.8 g of citric acid and 2 g of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate).

    • Follow the above steps, and make another measuring cup of length 2.5 cm.

    • This measuring cup can hold approximately 0.5 g of lime powder.

  2. Take a medium sized balloon. Take the 5 cm long measuring cup, made in the previous step, and fill it to the brim with baking soda (sodium bicarbonate). 1 unit = 1 full measuring cup.
    • Take a medium sized balloon.

    • Take the 5 cm long measuring cup, made in the previous step, and fill it to the brim with baking soda (sodium bicarbonate).

    • 1 unit = 1 full measuring cup.

    • Add two units of baking soda into the balloon.

  3. Take an empty waste plastic bottle, and add  approximately 35 ml of water into it. 1 test tube ~ 17 ml. 1 unit = 1 full measuring cup.
    • Take an empty waste plastic bottle, and add approximately 35 ml of water into it.

    • 1 test tube ~ 17 ml.

    • 1 unit = 1 full measuring cup.

    • Using the 5 cm measuring cup, add two units of citric acid crystals into the waste plastic bottle, containing 35 ml of water.

    • Shake the bottle well, and ensure to dissolve the citric acid crystals completely. Our citric acid solution is now ready.

  4. Attach the balloon to the waste plastic bottle, containing the citric acid solution. Be gentle while attaching the balloon over the waste plastic bottle opening. Ensure not to spill the contents of the balloon into the waste plastic bottle. Be gentle while attaching the balloon over the waste plastic bottle opening. Ensure not to spill the contents of the balloon into the waste plastic bottle.
    • Attach the balloon to the waste plastic bottle, containing the citric acid solution.

    • Be gentle while attaching the balloon over the waste plastic bottle opening. Ensure not to spill the contents of the balloon into the waste plastic bottle.

  5. Hold the balloon vertically, and allow the baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) to fall into the citric acid solution. Observe the chemical reaction. After 5 minutes, when the balloon stops inflating, tie a string at its bottom. Gently remove the inflated balloon from the waste plastic bottle.
    • Hold the balloon vertically, and allow the baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) to fall into the citric acid solution.

    • Observe the chemical reaction.

    • After 5 minutes, when the balloon stops inflating, tie a string at its bottom. Gently remove the inflated balloon from the waste plastic bottle.

    • Tie a simple knot such that, it can be removed easily, later.

  6. Discard the contents of the waste plastic bottle used in the previous step, and wash it thoroughly. Add approximately 35 ml of water into the waste plastic bottle. Add three units of lime powder into the waste plastic bottle, using 2.5 cm measuring cup. Shake the bottle well. 1 test tube ~ 17 ml.
    • Discard the contents of the waste plastic bottle used in the previous step, and wash it thoroughly.

    • Add approximately 35 ml of water into the waste plastic bottle. Add three units of lime powder into the waste plastic bottle, using 2.5 cm measuring cup. Shake the bottle well.

    • 1 test tube ~ 17 ml.

    • 1 unit = 1 full measuring cup.

    • Our lime solution is now ready.

  7. Make a filter paper cone, by  following the steps labelled 1 - 4. Take a waste empty plastic bottle. Cut it into 2 portions. The upper portion of the cut bottle will act as a funnel, whereas the lower portion will act as a container.
    • Make a filter paper cone, by following the steps labelled 1 - 4.

    • Take a waste empty plastic bottle. Cut it into 2 portions.

    • The upper portion of the cut bottle will act as a funnel, whereas the lower portion will act as a container.

    • Place the filter paper cone inside the funnel. Pour the lime solution through it. The filtered lime solution gets collected in the container.

    • Ensure to obtain a clear solution of lime.

  8. Fill half of the test tube with the filtered lime solution, and attach the inflated balloon to its mouth. Gently remove the string attached to the inflated balloon. Gently, squeeze the inflated balloon while holding it tight, to expedite the movement of gas into the test tube. Observe the lime solution turning milky white.
    • Fill half of the test tube with the filtered lime solution, and attach the inflated balloon to its mouth. Gently remove the string attached to the inflated balloon.

    • Gently, squeeze the inflated balloon while holding it tight, to expedite the movement of gas into the test tube.

    • Observe the lime solution turning milky white.

    • Ensure to keep the balloon-bottle set up air tight.

    • Ensure to take sufficient quantity of citric acid crystals.

    • Ensure to take sufficient quantity of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate).

    • Water used to prepare lime water solution, might be contaminated - Usage of drinking water is recommended.

    • Ensure to take a clear, filtered solution of lime.

  9. Use a different acid.
    • Use a different acid.

    • Use a different base.

    • Increase the concentration of citric acid and baking soda (sodium bicarbonate).

    • To learn more about the variations, go to Acid Base Reaction (Variations).

Finish Line

Vishal Bhatt

Member since: 04/26/2017

2,752 Reputation

81 Guides authored

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