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1.2

Minor Versionm

by Procheta Mallik

Introduction

Make your own pinhole camera using your toolkit by making a hole in one of the end caps and placing a butter-paper screen within the tube to see lovely inverted images!

Video Overview

    • Handle the scissors/cutter with care

    • Light candle under adult supervision

    • Be careful about the hot metal wire piece

  1. Heat a piece of metal wire on a candle and use it to pierce a hole in the centre of one of your toolkit end caps. Given the thickness of the cap, you may need to keep reheating the wire to eventually get a hole. Given the thickness of the cap, you may need to keep reheating the wire to eventually get a hole.
    • Heat a piece of metal wire on a candle and use it to pierce a hole in the centre of one of your toolkit end caps.

    • Given the thickness of the cap, you may need to keep reheating the wire to eventually get a hole.

  2. Trace the outline of the end cap on a thin piece of cardboard Cut this circle out
    • Trace the outline of the end cap on a thin piece of cardboard

    • Cut this circle out

  3. Draw a dashed concentric circle of radius 1 cm less than the cardboard circle Cut this circular cardboard ring out Cut this circular cardboard ring out
    • Draw a dashed concentric circle of radius 1 cm less than the cardboard circle

    • Cut this circular cardboard ring out

  4. Tape the ends of the circular cardboard cutout. Put few drops of glue on the rim hence created so that butter paper can be glued on it. Put few drops of glue on the rim hence created so that butter paper can be glued on it.
    • Tape the ends of the circular cardboard cutout.

    • Put few drops of glue on the rim hence created so that butter paper can be glued on it.

  5. Glue a piece of translucent paper/butter paper on the cardboard rim, as shown Using scissors, trim off the edges of the translucent paper to make it a circular screen. Using scissors, trim off the edges of the translucent paper to make it a circular screen.
    • Glue a piece of translucent paper/butter paper on the cardboard rim, as shown

    • Using scissors, trim off the edges of the translucent paper to make it a circular screen.

  6. Place the translucent paper screen at the centre of the cylindrical tube . Close one end of the tube with the lid you made a hole in Place a lit candle on the outside, near the lid .
    • Place the translucent paper screen at the centre of the cylindrical tube .

    • Close one end of the tube with the lid you made a hole in

    • Place a lit candle on the outside, near the lid .

    • This works better if you are in a darker room

  7. Try to get a sharp picture of the flame by moving the tube towards or away from the candle. Always view the screen from the open end of the tube
    • Try to get a sharp picture of the flame by moving the tube towards or away from the candle.

    • Always view the screen from the open end of the tube

  8. Now make multiple holes on the lid and view the image made by a lit candle near the lid Play with the pinhole camera by focusing the images formed . Play with the pinhole camera by focusing the images formed .
    • Now make multiple holes on the lid and view the image made by a lit candle near the lid

    • Play with the pinhole camera by focusing the images formed .

  9. View the image formed on the screen from the open end of the tube by pointing on any real objects/building/trees. Minimize the stray light entering from the viewing side of the tube.
    • View the image formed on the screen from the open end of the tube by pointing on any real objects/building/trees.

    • Minimize the stray light entering from the viewing side of the tube.

    • In our case, you can see the inverted image of the building, street-sign stand and trees as seen through the pinhole camera.

    • The flame of the candle and the hole at the centre of the lid should be aligned.

    • The hole(s) shouldn't be too big

    • External light should be minimised from the viewing side.

    • How does the image form on the screen? Why is it always inverted?

    • What's the difference between the images when the hole is big versus when it's small?

    • What's the difference in focusing when we view far away objects (e.g. the building) versus closer objects (e.g. candle)?

    • How does "focusing" work? Is it the same as in our digital optical cameras? Explore!

Finish Line

Suhail Ahanger

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