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Minor Versionm

by Kailash NR

Introduction

Compare the elasticity of cotton thread, metal wire and rubber band by coiling them around a pen/pencil.

Video Overview

    • Be careful with the pokey ends of the binding wire

    • Exercise caution while using cutters/scissors

  1. Take a piece of thin binding wire - about 20cm long. Now wrap the wire around the pencil as shown in the figure. Continue this until all of the wire is wound around the pencil, without overlapping.
    • Take a piece of thin binding wire - about 20cm long.

    • Now wrap the wire around the pencil as shown in the figure.

    • Continue this until all of the wire is wound around the pencil, without overlapping.

    • It's okay if the wire is shorter or longer than the mentioned length - as long as it coils around the pencil at least a few times.

  2. Once the wire is completely wound around the pencil, let go off any pressure on the wire and observe. Then push the wire together as shown. Then push the wire together as shown.
    • Once the wire is completely wound around the pencil, let go off any pressure on the wire and observe.

    • Then push the wire together as shown.

  3. Start pushing the wire towards the end of the pencil inch by inch. Finally, completely remove it from the pencil and observe its shape. You can remove the coiled wire from either side of the pencil - whichever is closer.
    • Start pushing the wire towards the end of the pencil inch by inch.

    • Finally, completely remove it from the pencil and observe its shape.

    • You can remove the coiled wire from either side of the pencil - whichever is closer.

  4. Cut a piece of cotton thread about 25cm long. Start coiling the thread around the pencil as shown. Keep coiling until the whole thread is wrapped around the pencil.
    • Cut a piece of cotton thread about 25cm long.

    • Start coiling the thread around the pencil as shown.

    • Keep coiling until the whole thread is wrapped around the pencil.

    • It's okay if the thread is longer or shorter than the mentioned length as long as it coils at least a few times around the pencil.

  5. Once the thread is completely coiled around the pencil, let go of any force on the thread and observe. Then, start pushing the thread together and towards the corner of the pencil. You might have to apply some pressure to push the thread towards the end of the pencil. Try and avoid any overlapping of coils
    • Once the thread is completely coiled around the pencil, let go of any force on the thread and observe.

    • Then, start pushing the thread together and towards the corner of the pencil.

    • You might have to apply some pressure to push the thread towards the end of the pencil. Try and avoid any overlapping of coils

    • Push the thread off the pencil, as shown, and observe!

  6. Take a rubber band of medium size. Cut it open with scissors so that it is no longer a loop. Cut it open with scissors so that it is no longer a loop.
    • Take a rubber band of medium size.

    • Cut it open with scissors so that it is no longer a loop.

  7. Start coiling the rubber band around the pencil as shown in the figure. Do this until the whole rubber band is coiled - do not stretch the rubber band. Release the pressure you're applying with your finger on the rubber band.
    • Start coiling the rubber band around the pencil as shown in the figure.

    • Do this until the whole rubber band is coiled - do not stretch the rubber band.

    • Release the pressure you're applying with your finger on the rubber band.

    • And observe!

    • It is better to start coiling the rubber band towards the end as it will be hard to push it towards the end later.

    • This time, stretch the rubber band and wrap it around the pencil. Once the whole rubber band is coiled, release the pressure and observe!

  8. After the experiments, this was the state of all the materials. Try it out yourself!
    • After the experiments, this was the state of all the materials. Try it out yourself!

    • If the rubber band breaks while stretching, do not worry - use a new one and apply less pressure on it this time.

    • If it is hard to push the cotton thread towards the end, coil it really tight towards the edge from the beginning itself.

    • If you cannot find a pencil, any cylindrical thin object will do (pen, sketch pen etc).

    • Try this with different materials! You could use silk threads, wires, straws etc.

    • Does the newly shapes wire (coil) act as a spring? Try hanging a weight off it to see if it spring back up.

    • What would happen if you left the cotton thread for a while on the pencil and then removed it? Would you have the same result?

    • What happens to all of these objects every time you release pressure? Do they change much from their original shape?

    • What happens when you remove the support of the pencil if they did maintain their new coiled shape after removing pressure?

    • Would you consider the spring you made out of binding wire elastic? Is the binding wire in itself elastic? What about the rubber band?

    • Does it surprise you that to make a spring (which is elastic), you need metal (which is inelastic)? And that with an elastic material (rubber band) you cannot make a spring?

Finish Line

Suchitha Vishwa

Member since: 05/02/2017

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