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1.3

Minor Versionm

by Vishal Bhatt

Introduction

There are all kinds of chemical reactions. Here, with simple household materials, we observe one that can be attempted by anyone at home or in the classroom: electrolysis of water

Video Overview

    • Handle the scissors/cutter with care.

    • Do not drink/ingest any of the salt or water.

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  1. Take 200 ml of water in a transparent container.
    • Take 200 ml of water in a transparent container.

    • Mix two table spoons of salt in the water.

    • Take two insulated wires of length 20 cm - removing about 2cm insulation from each end - and any battery in the range of 1.5-9 volts.

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    • Take two iron nails.

    • Place the iron nails in the beaker containing saltwater in such a way that some part of the nails are exposed to the air, i.e. not submerged fully. Tape them along the walls of the beaker.

    • Connect and tape one end of each wire to the iron nails and the other to the battery terminals as shown.

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    • Leave the apparatus for some time so that the electrolysis reaction takes place.

    • Meanwhile take a bottle and cut it in half by using a cutter/scissor.

    • Place the upper part inverted on to the lower part of the bottle.

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    • Place a filter paper on the upper part of the bottle .

    • Disconnect the battery and the nails and empty the contents of the beaker into the filter paper.

    • Once the filter paper dries out (1 day) you can find a brown powder collected on the filter paper.

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    • Do not use rusted iron nails.

    • Make sure the iron nails are not completely dipped in water.

    • Make sure the wires are taped and connected correctly .

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    • What happens when you conduct the same experiment with plain water? With sugar water?

    • How do the iron nails look after the experiment?

    • Have you noticed similar "coatings" form on other metal surfaces when left exposed to air and moisture? What about food items?

    • Why do apples, guavas, brinjals etc. turn brown when cut and left exposed?

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Finish Line

Procheta Mallik

Member since: 05/02/2017

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