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1.1

Minor Versionm

by Suhail Ahanger

Introduction

Use the given bar and ring magnets to identify their poles and compare their orientations.

Tools

No tools required.

Parts

  1. Take the bar magnet and 40 cm of thread to suspend the magnet in air.
    • Take the bar magnet and 40 cm of thread to suspend the magnet in air.

    • Tie one end of the thread to the centre of the magnet and make a knot so that it stays firm.

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  2. In case of the provided magnet, the poles are on the flat faces of the magnet
    • In case of the provided magnet, the poles are on the flat faces of the magnet

    • This picture with yellow lines shows one of the two poles of the magnet.

    • Refer to the picture to identify the sides that have the poles of the magnet.

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    • Suspend the magnet in air by holding the thread

    • The magnet should come to a stop such that the poles of the magnet are aligned in the North-South direction.

    • You can verify it by conducting multiple trials facing various directions.

    • The poles of the magnet should end up pointing consistently in the same direction, regardless of the direction you face or start in.

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    • To know which is the South pole of the magnet and which the North, you may calibrate it based on your knowledge of east and west (sunrise and sunset) at your location.

    • E.g. if the Sun rises on your right, then you are facing north. Which means that the south pole of the magnet will point in that direction.

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    • Repeat the same procedure with a ring magnet.

    • Try to identify the poles of the ring magnet based on your analysis with the bar magnet.

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    • Stack six ring magnets over each other .

    • Tie a thread through the central hole

    • Repeat the same suspending procedure and before.

    • Notice how the increase in magnetic field strength helps to overcome the tension of the string.

    • Stacking up multiple ring magnets will effectively give you a traditional bar magnet, i.e. the poles are at the far ends of the magnet.

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    • Explore how to identify the north and south poles of a magnet so that you don't need the sunrise/sunset data to arrive at the directions. For example, in a location you are not familiar with, or on a cloudy day or at night!

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Finish Line

Kailash NR

Member since: 05/02/2017

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71 Guides authored

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