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2.5

Major VersionM

by Raghottam Joshi

Introduction

A copper coil connected to a cell acts as an electromagnet, which then interacts with a permanent magnet to simulate the functioning of a simple DC Motor.

Video Overview

    • Be wary of the sharp/pointy end of the safety pins and the copper wire.

    • Exercise caution while using the paper cutter.

    • Do not keep the coil connected to the cell for a long time, since copper gets heated and it also drains the cell.

  1. Take 60 cm of insulated (enamelled) copper wire and wind it around the cell. Carefully remove the coil from the cell. Tie knots on both ends to secure the coil.
    • Take 60 cm of insulated (enamelled) copper wire and wind it around the cell.

    • Carefully remove the coil from the cell.

    • Tie knots on both ends to secure the coil.

    • Make sure the loose ends are exactly diametrically opposite, i.e 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock!

  2. Trim off the excess copper wire at the ends, so that the length of the coil and the leads are around 2 cm longer than the cell. The two leads should be of the same length. Use a paper cutter and scrape the insulation from one entire lead, i.e. the lead is scraped entirely.
    • Trim off the excess copper wire at the ends, so that the length of the coil and the leads are around 2 cm longer than the cell.

    • The two leads should be of the same length.

    • Use a paper cutter and scrape the insulation from one entire lead, i.e. the lead is scraped entirely.

    • The other lead should be scraped on three-quarters of the circumference, but much like the first lead, along its entire length, i.e. the lead is scraped on three sides.

    • Alternatively, you can use scissors or sandpaper for scraping off the insulation layer.

  3. Place the cell inside the cut cycle tube. "Lock" end of the pin. "Hinge" end of the pin.
    • Place the cell inside the cut cycle tube.

    • "Lock" end of the pin.

    • "Hinge" end of the pin.

    • Insert the pin in between the cycle tube and cell.

    • Place the safety pin perpendicular to the cell so that the "lock" end of the safety pin touches the end of the cell.

    • Repeat the previous step on the other terminal as well.

  4. Place two ring magnets on the surface of the cell, in between the two safety pins. If necessary, use tape to secure the magnets. Add another magnet.
    • Place two ring magnets on the surface of the cell, in between the two safety pins.

    • If necessary, use tape to secure the magnets.

    • Add another magnet.

  5. Insert the ends of the coil through the "hinge" ends of the safety pins so that the coil aligns directly above the magnets. The coil should spin once you give it a small impetus (push).
    • Insert the ends of the coil through the "hinge" ends of the safety pins so that the coil aligns directly above the magnets.

    • The coil should spin once you give it a small impetus (push).

  6. Magnetise a paper pin by rubbing a ring magnet along its length in one direction, around 30-40 times. Suspend the paper pin freely with the help of a piece of thread. Remove the magnet from the motor and bring it close to the suspended paper pin. What happens?
    • Magnetise a paper pin by rubbing a ring magnet along its length in one direction, around 30-40 times.

    • Suspend the paper pin freely with the help of a piece of thread.

    • Remove the magnet from the motor and bring it close to the suspended paper pin. What happens?

    • The coil should be conducting current. For this to happen, ensure that the scraped copper coil at both ends is in contact with the safety pins.

    • Notice the deflection of the paper pin when the coil is brought near the suspended paper pin.

    • What happens if we turn the cell such that the other side of the coil faces the suspended pin?

    • The number of turns in the coil might be less, use a longer wire to get the number of turns.

    • Safety pins might not be in contact with the cell terminals.

    • The insulation layer might not be properly scraped off at the ends of the coil.

    • Use a new and powerful cell.

    • The ends of the coil might not be long enough to stay and spin within the safety pins.

  7. Change the shape of the coil, say spherical. In the case of a spherical shape, create a gap between the turns, like a beehive, and see if the coil spins. Make the coil using a different material, like binding wire. Scrape the leads of the coil entirely.
    • Change the shape of the coil, say spherical. In the case of a spherical shape, create a gap between the turns, like a beehive, and see if the coil spins.

    • Make the coil using a different material, like binding wire.

    • Scrape the leads of the coil entirely.

    • Make a double-coil motor.

    • Make a coil using a thinner gauge (35 gauge) enamelled copper wire.

    • Make a smaller diameter coil.

    • For more information go to DC Motor (Variations).

Finish Line

Madhushree HS

Member since: 05/02/2017

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