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1.4

Minor Versionm

by Suhail Ahanger

Introduction

Using the energy stored in a rubber band, we make a self-propelled bottle boat using ice-cream sticks as the propeller. This shows how ducks swim and how ships propel themselves.

Video Overview

    • Exercise caution when using paper cutter/scissor

  1. Measure the spoke length and mark the midpoints of both the spokes. Attach spokes on to the bottle using small size rubber bands. Attach spokes on to the bottle using small size rubber bands.
    • Measure the spoke length and mark the midpoints of both the spokes.

    • Attach spokes on to the bottle using small size rubber bands.

  2. Insert spokes at diametrically opposite ends up to the halfway mark, and keep the bent end towards the cap Make the spokes hold firmly on to the bottle by applying adhesive tape Use glue where ever tape is used to have stronger adhesion.
    • Insert spokes at diametrically opposite ends up to the halfway mark, and keep the bent end towards the cap

    • Make the spokes hold firmly on to the bottle by applying adhesive tape

    • Use glue where ever tape is used to have stronger adhesion.

  3. Cut the ice cream stick such that its length is slightly more than the gap between the spokes. Make notches at both ends of the ice cream stick (to fit into the spokes) and stick it to the bottom of the bottle with tape. Use Glue for better adhesion wherever sticking of tape is required
    • Cut the ice cream stick such that its length is slightly more than the gap between the spokes.

    • Make notches at both ends of the ice cream stick (to fit into the spokes) and stick it to the bottom of the bottle with tape.

    • Use Glue for better adhesion wherever sticking of tape is required

  4. Secure a medium or large sized rubber band near the end of the spokes Secure a medium or large sized rubber band near the end of the spokes
    • Secure a medium or large sized rubber band near the end of the spokes

  5. Take 2 ice-cream sticks and measure them such that their length is the diameter of the bottom of the bottle + 2cm, and cut them to that size This is the length of your propeller Glue/tape the sticks together, laterally, to make your propeller.
    • Take 2 ice-cream sticks and measure them such that their length is the diameter of the bottom of the bottle + 2cm, and cut them to that size

    • This is the length of your propeller

    • Glue/tape the sticks together, laterally, to make your propeller.

  6. Attach the propeller near the middle of the rubber band to avoid tilting during propulsion. Attach the propeller near the middle of the rubber band to avoid tilting during propulsion.
    • Attach the propeller near the middle of the rubber band to avoid tilting during propulsion.

  7. Now twist the rubber band multiple times with the propeller and release it after placing it in water.
    • Now twist the rubber band multiple times with the propeller and release it after placing it in water.

    • Water is getting inside the bottle: Check if the bottle cap is tightened properly and if any hole is present along the floating side.

    • Boat not balanced while floating: Check that the spokes are at diametrically opposite ends. Also ensure the propeller is exactly in the middle of the rubber band.

    • Twist the propeller rubber band in both directions and observe the direction of motion.

    • Use a bottle with a sharp bend (90 degrees) at the front. Does it turn on its own? Compare this with a smooth curvature at the front end of boats or big ships.

    • How does twisting the rubber band translate to the forward propulsion of the bottle?

    • Try shifting the spokes towards the propeller and see how that affects the motion/balance. What happens if it is heavy near the cap of the bottle or near the propeller end of the bottle?

    • Use thread instead of rubber band to hold the propeller. With the same number of twists as in the rubber band, compare the motion of the bottle.

    • Try with bottles of different size

    • Length of spokes or other parts used instead of spokes may vary depending on the size of the bottle used

    • Binding wire or nylon thread or adhesive tape can be used instead of rubber bands to hold the spokes on to the bottle.

    • Propeller material can be of plastic or a thin wooden sheet, cut out in a rectangular shape.

Finish Line

Suhail Ahanger

Member since: 05/02/2017

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